We Seal That

November 21, 2013 by  
Filed under Testimonials




It is a known fact that cracks in asphalt are wider, bigger, and deeper during the winter months; therefore crack sealing now not only makes More sense, but Is a strategic plan of action that defends the life of your asphalt and gets you more protection for your dollar!
Super Services LLC is now offering incredible package discounts for all asphalt maintenance services contracted during our save your pavement event.

Www.saveyourpavement.com
800-858-SEAL (7325)

Asphalt Sealing

January 11, 2013 by  
Filed under Testimonials




We are a full service asphalt sealcoating company located in Connecticut and we can help with all your asphalt needs.

We specialize in the following asphalt repair services:

* New England Asphalt Sealing Repair
* New England Asphalt Sealcoating
* New England Asphalt Sealing
* New England Asphalt Crack repair
* New Englandt Asphalt Patching
* New England Asphalt Striping

We provide asphalt repair services in the following areas: The Entire New England Region and surrounding areas

Please do not hesitate to contact us for a free New England asphalt sealcoating or asphalt sealing estimate at the following contact information:

Toll Free 1-800-858 SEAL (7325)

pavement protection sealcoating sealing seal coating driveways parking lots black top hot rubber crack fill

Link: http://saveyourpavement.com

driveway sealing parking lot sealcoating hot crack fill black top seal coating asphalt pavement protection maintenance sealer sealcoater coatings

Sealcoating asphalt pavement is a very beneficial procedure, which should be performed within the first year of a new asphalt pavement’s life in order to be of greatest benefit and should be repeated every two to five years as needed, throughout the life of the pavement. Following a regular sealcoating regiment will help your asphalt pavement to last up to twice as long and Look twice as good.

Cracksealing or filling can help extend the life of pavement if done properly.
There are two types of cracks – working and non-working. Working cracks have a considerable amount of horizontal or vertical movement
– greater than or equal to 3 mm – because of temperature change or amount of traffic, according to the
Materials and Procedures for Sealing and Filling Cracks in Asphalt-Surfaced Pavement – Manual of Practice. Non-working cracks typically have “little movement between crack edges.”
The Manual defines cracksealing as placing “specialized treatment materials above or into working cracks to prevent the intrusion of water.” Crack filling is the “placement of ordinary treatment materials into non- working cracks to reduce infiltration of water and to reinforce the adjacent pavement.”
But before property owners, property managers or contractors, crackseal or crack fill, they should understand why and how cracks occur.
in different temperature environments.
WHAT CAN WE DO FOR YOU ?

Super Services LLC is a full service asphalt pavement contractor!
We offer an in depth evaluation and a free estimate.We will identify your specific needs and requirements.We can perform any asphalt
pavement services required, using the highest quality materials, combined with great customer service and affordable rates.

ASPHALT PAVEMENT MAINTENANCE

FACT:
Sealcoating asphalt pavement is a very beneficial procedure,
which should be performed within the first year of a new asphalt pavement’s life in order to be of greatest benefit and should be repeated every two to five years as needed, throughout the
life of the pavement. Following a regular sealcoating regiment will help your asphalt pavement to last up to twice as long and Look
twice as good as pavement, which is not properly sealed.

An annual inspection and survey of your pavements is the first step after recognition of need for preservation. This will enable us to determine which pavement sections will respond to preservation, and which are beyond it. Next, we will design a strategy that will fit into your budget and bring your pavement sections into a higher level of service, and reduce the cost of owning asphalt.

understanding how sealcoating works

December 14, 2011 by  
Filed under Testimonials




Understanding how sealcoating works…

and how it can save you money.

courtesy of the Pavement Pro’s of the National Pavement Contractors Association

By Girish Dubey

Research has demonstrated that properly applied (and properly timed) sealcoat can save the owner of a property $100,000 or more — over the life of a hot mix asphalt pavement. But what does seal-coat actually do that results in this substantial savings?

To understand how sealcoating works, it is necessary to understand the nature of the asphalt pavement itself. Because of its excellent waterproofing, flexibility, and adhesive properties to bind and hold the aggregates in the pavement, asphalt has been used extensively for paving and road construction. Prior to the advent of asphalt as a paving material, roads were constructed by spreading graded aggregates over a road bed. These roads worked well as long as the stones remained in place and stayed dry. Naturally, these roads needed constant repair. Stone would shift under the traffic and the road’s load carrying capacity was severely damaged when it rained. The stone would absorb water, swell and lose its strength. But spraying asphalt on the surface overcame this problem somewhat. Asphalt paving technology gradually evolved and today the vast majority of all roads are constructed using asphalt as the binding material for the aggregates. Due to its waterproofing properties, asphalt protects the aggregates from absorbing water, thus preserving their strength and load-carrying capacities. Today’s asphalt pavement is a mixture of stone aggregate and mineral filler combined with 4.5% to 12% (average of 6%) asphaltic binder (asphalt cement). The strength of an asphalt pavement is directly related to the pavement design from the ground up. The asphalt pavement people see is only the “roof,” so to speak, of the entire pavement. This “roof” covers a bed of graded stone aggregates of varying depths according to ground conditions as well as traffic requirements. This base of aggregate is what really carries the load of the traffic. The same theory applies to off-street parking lots or drive-ways. A firm resilient surface that provides a roof over the stone base will keep the pavement bed dry. It is important to have an elastic characteristic in this pavement so that it can expand and contract and still remain intact.

Why seal asphalt?

In spite of its excellent adhesive and waterproofing properties, asphalt has some serious drawbacks that relate to its chemical makeup. Asphalt is a very complex mixture of thousands of chemicals which are predominantly open chain (aliphatic) in structure with a considerable degree of un-saturation within their molecular structure. The open chain provides easy access to weather, salts, and chemicals to attack and disintegrate the asphaltic molecules. As the asphaltic molecules disintegrate, the asphalt in the pavement loses much of its original properties, such as binding and waterproofing. The first visual sign of this phenomenon is a progressive change in the color of asphalt pavement from rich black to brown to gray. Furthermore, asphalt, being a byproduct of the petroleum distillation process, is easily dissolved by other products that also are derived from petroleum, such as oils, fats, grease, mineral spirits etc. The reason is quite logical: As petroleum, these various products existed together for millions of years. It is only through the petroleum refining process that they are separated for various uses. Because these individual products come from the same source, they have a natural affinity for one another and when put in contact with each other will try to join together again. So when automotive oil or gasoline — both petroleum distillates — leak onto an asphalt pavement, they will work to easily dissolve the similar chemicals in asphalt. These problems are associated primarily with off-street pavements such as parking lots, minor streets, airport aprons or runways, service stations, and home driveways, which carry low levels of traffic.
Roads, having the advantage of continuously rolling traffic, do not need protection because the rolling action of the traffic steadily brings the lower layers, rich in asphalt, to the surface and “kneads” the oxidized surface layers back into the pavement. Eventually all the asphalt binder is exhausted and the aggregates begin to unravel due to the absence of the binding cement. This happens to all pavement including roads. The rate of pavement deterioration depends upon the traffic volume as well as climatic conditions. The next step is the development of minor cracks which widen and deepen with time. If the cracks are not repaired at this stage, water seeps into the base courses and damages the pavement’s load bearing capacity. It is evidenced by rutting, shifting, and serious alligatoring. The pavement then must be either overlaid or completely removed and reinstalled, depending on the condition. Off-street pavements do not have the advantage of this “kneading” action. The surface layers of off-road pavements are under continuous attack from the weather and other destructive elements, eventually developing minor surface cracks. Again, aggregates start unraveling producing minor cracks which widen and deepen with time. The damage will continue if proper protective actions are not taken. So it would be logical to conclude that off-street pavements can be preserved by a “protective coating” that resists attack by the elements that destroy the asphalt in the first place.

Asphalt Information

September 24, 2011 by  
Filed under Testimonials




A Little About Asphalt

Asphalt pavement may be one of the most taken for granted substances in a busy and mobile society like ours. We drive on it, walk on it, park our cars on it – even play basketball or tennis on it. But most of us rarely think about what the world would be like without this simple yet useful substance.

Even fewer people probably think much about where asphalt comes from. While the asphalt used on roads today is carefully blended in a mixing plant, the basic components come from liquid asphalt and rock.

Natural asphalt – also called tar – is a petrochemical substance manufactured by the earth in much the same way as crude oil. Leftover organic material from eons past becomes tar in time and under great pressure. Sometimes this natural substance breaks to the surface of the earth, bubbling up from beneath the ground as it does at California’s famous La Brea tar pits. In fact, this natural asphalt has preserved many a dinosaur or mastodon for scientists to study tens of thousands of years later.

Asphalt is naturally water resistant and flexible, even when hard. It is ideal for road paving because it is viscous when hot, but solid when cool. So when this hot liquid is blended with crushed stone the result is a solid, moldable substance that can resist heat, cold, water and freezing. Today’s asphalt paving material is about 95% aggregate and sand. The remaining 5% is liquid asphalt – the glue that holds it all together.

ASPHALT PROTECTION

August 30, 2011 by  
Filed under Testimonials




Research has demonstrated that properly applied (and properly timed) sealcoat can save the owner of a property $100,000 or more — over the life of a hot mix asphalt pavement. But what does seal-coat actually do that results in this substantial savings?

To understand how sealcoating works, it is necessary to understand the nature of the asphalt pavement itself. Because of its excellent waterproofing, flexibility, and adhesive properties to bind and hold the aggregates in the pavement, asphalt has been used extensively for paving and road construction. Prior to the advent of asphalt as a paving material, roads were constructed by spreading graded aggregates over a road bed. These roads worked well as long as the stones remained in place and stayed dry. Naturally, these roads needed constant repair. Stone would shift under the traffic and the road’s load carrying capacity was severely damaged when it rained. The stone would absorb water, swell and lose its strength. But spraying asphalt on the surface overcame this problem somewhat. Asphalt paving technology gradually evolved and today the vast majority of all roads are constructed using asphalt as the binding material for the aggregates. Due to its waterproofing properties, asphalt protects the aggregates from absorbing water, thus preserving their strength and load-carrying capacities. Today’s asphalt pavement is a mixture of stone aggregate and mineral filler combined with 4.5% to 12% (average of 6%) asphaltic binder (asphalt cement). The strength of an asphalt pavement is directly related to the pavement design from the ground up. The asphalt pavement people see is only the “roof,” so to speak, of the entire pavement. This “roof” covers a bed of graded stone aggregates of varying depths according to ground conditions as well as traffic requirements. This base of aggregate is what really carries the load of the traffic. The same theory applies to off-street parking lots or drive-ways. A firm resilient surface that provides a roof over the stone base will keep the pavement bed dry. It is important to have an elastic characteristic in this pavement so that it can expand and contract and still remain intact.

Why seal asphalt?

In spite of its excellent adhesive and waterproofing properties, asphalt has some serious drawbacks that relate to its chemical makeup. Asphalt is a very complex mixture of thousands of chemicals which are predominantly open chain (aliphatic) in structure with a considerable degree of un-saturation within their molecular structure. The open chain provides easy access to weather, salts, and chemicals to attack and disintegrate the asphaltic molecules. As the asphaltic molecules disintegrate, the asphalt in the pavement loses much of its original properties, such as binding and waterproofing. The first visual sign of this phenomenon is a progressive change in the color of asphalt pavement from rich black to brown to gray. Furthermore, asphalt, being a byproduct of the petroleum distillation process, is easily dissolved by other products that also are derived from petroleum, such as oils, fats, grease, mineral spirits etc. The reason is quite logical: As petroleum, these various products existed together for millions of years. It is only through the petroleum refining process that they are separated for various uses. Because these individual products come from the same source, they have a natural affinity for one another and when put in contact with each other will try to join together again. So when automotive oil or gasoline — both petroleum distillates — leak onto an asphalt pavement, they will work to easily dissolve the similar chemicals in asphalt. These problems are associated primarily with off-street pavements such as parking lots, minor streets, airport aprons or runways, service stations, and home driveways, which carry low levels of traffic.
Roads, having the advantage of continuously rolling traffic, do not need protection because the rolling action of the traffic steadily brings the lower layers, rich in asphalt, to the surface and “kneads” the oxidized surface layers back into the pavement. Eventually all the asphalt binder is exhausted and the aggregates begin to unravel due to the absence of the binding cement. This happens to all pavement including roads. The rate of pavement deterioration depends upon the traffic volume as well as climatic conditions. The next step is the development of minor cracks which widen and deepen with time. If the cracks are not repaired at this stage, water seeps into the base courses and damages the pavement’s load bearing capacity. It is evidenced by rutting, shifting, and serious alligatoring. The pavement then must be either overlaid or completely removed and reinstalled, depending on the condition. Off-street pavements do not have the advantage of this “kneading” action. The surface layers of off-road pavements are under continuous attack from the weather and other destructive elements, eventually developing minor surface cracks. Again, aggregates start unraveling producing minor cracks which widen and deepen with time. The damage will continue if proper protective actions are not taken. So it would be logical to conclude that off-street pavements can be preserved by a “protective coating” that resists attack by the elements that destroy the asphalt in the first place

Should you be concerned about cracks in your Asphalt?

May 16, 2011 by  
Filed under Testimonials




YES! Cracks in asphalt are a sign your driveway or parking area is need of attention.  A crack, often caused by changes in temperature
and weather conditions, provides an opening for chemicals and water to work their way into the substrate of the asphalt allowing further
deterioration beneath the surface. This in turn will cause the formation of larger cracks and holes. This not only leads to a bigger
expense down the road when it comes time to sealcoat, but decreases the life span of your paved area. Proper maintenance of
an asphalt driveway or parking lot requires prompt repair of cracks.
There are different kinds of cracks. Single line cracks are the easiest to fix. A hairline crack, less than ¼ inches, does not need
to be repaired separately but can be filled with sealant. A crack ¼ inches to 2 inches in size should be fixed with a special
crack filler and sealer. Anything larger is actually considered a pot hole and should be treated as such.
Some cracked areas have a “chicken wire” pattern. These areas are more severe and indicate that the substrate has been
damaged and is considered a pot hole. If they have not sunk down a bit already, they will in time. These areas again require
the attention of a professional.
Before beginning doing the repair work yourself, it may be helpful to contact your local Sealcoating Professional for an estimate. Having the
cracks and holes repaired professionally may save you time and money in the long run. Incorrectly repaired cracks will not properly protect your asphalt from further deterioration.

Sealcoating Preparation

May 16, 2011 by  
Filed under Testimonials




Proper maintenance of an asphalt surface requires periodic sealcoating. Asphalt will deteriorate over time from the effects of weather, rain,
sun, chemicals, etc. Sealcoating, like painting the exterior of a house, will protect your driveway or parking area from the elements and
save you money in the long run.
One of the most important steps in the sealcoating process is surface preparation. In order to obtain a properly sealed driveway
or parking area, several steps must be taken to insure proper adhesion of the sealcoating material and to eliminate any sub-surface
sources for future deterioration.
First, the area must be swept and cleaned thoroughly to remove all excess debris. Sometimes it is necessary to wash the
surface with water. Grass should be removed from around the edges and from any cracks or potholes that may be present.
A weed and grass killer may be applied. It is important that the roots be dead or removed on any vegetation that exists
in a crack or hole or it will continue to cause damage to the asphalt in the future. Grease spots should be cleaned, treated and primed.
The next, and one of the most important steps to be taken prior to sealcoating, is the repair of all cracks and holes.
The way each is handled will depend entirely on the size and nature of the crack or pothole. Small areas can be
remedied by the owner but larger areas should be professionally treated. Your sealcoating professional knows exactly
what steps should be taken for each type of area.
Generally the area is properly cleaned, filled and then these areas are sealed. The cleaning involves scraping away
any loose asphalt and smoothing the edges of the area. Next a filler product is used.
The actual sealcoating process will be done only when all preparation work is completed. Proper prepping will
insure that the sealcoating provides maximum protection. One or more top coats of sealant will be applied depending on the condition of the driveway.

Understanding why sealcoat helps to extend the life of asphalt pavement

April 29, 2011 by  
Filed under Testimonials




Understanding how sealcoating works…

and how it can save you money.

courtesy of the Pavement Pro’s of the National Pavement Contractors Association

By Girish Dubey

Research has demonstrated that properly applied (and properly timed) sealcoat can save the owner of a property $100,000 or more — over the life of a hot mix asphalt pavement. But what does seal-coat actually do that results in this substantial savings?

To understand how sealcoating works, it is necessary to understand the nature of the asphalt pavement itself. Because of its excellent waterproofing, flexibility, and adhesive properties to bind and hold the aggregates in the pavement, asphalt has been used extensively for paving and road construction. Prior to the advent of asphalt as a paving material, roads were constructed by spreading graded aggregates over a road bed. These roads worked well as long as the stones remained in place and stayed dry. Naturally, these roads needed constant repair. Stone would shift under the traffic and the road’s load carrying capacity was severely damaged when it rained. The stone would absorb water, swell and lose its strength. But spraying asphalt on the surface overcame this problem somewhat. Asphalt paving technology gradually evolved and today the vast majority of all roads are constructed using asphalt as the binding material for the aggregates. Due to its waterproofing properties, asphalt protects the aggregates from absorbing water, thus preserving their strength and load-carrying capacities. Today’s asphalt pavement is a mixture of stone aggregate and mineral filler combined with 4.5% to 12% (average of 6%) asphaltic binder (asphalt cement). The strength of an asphalt pavement is directly related to the pavement design from the ground up. The asphalt pavement people see is only the “roof,” so to speak, of the entire pavement. This “roof” covers a bed of graded stone aggregates of varying depths according to ground conditions as well as traffic requirements. This base of aggregate is what really carries the load of the traffic. The same theory applies to off-street parking lots or drive-ways. A firm resilient surface that provides a roof over the stone base will keep the pavement bed dry. It is important to have an elastic characteristic in this pavement so that it can expand and contract and still remain intact.

Why seal asphalt?

In spite of its excellent adhesive and waterproofing properties, asphalt has some serious drawbacks that relate to its chemical makeup. Asphalt is a very complex mixture of thousands of chemicals which are predominantly open chain (aliphatic) in structure with a considerable degree of un-saturation within their molecular structure. The open chain provides easy access to weather, salts, and chemicals to attack and disintegrate the asphaltic molecules. As the asphaltic molecules disintegrate, the asphalt in the pavement loses much of its original properties, such as binding and waterproofing. The first visual sign of this phenomenon is a progressive change in the color of asphalt pavement from rich black to brown to gray. Furthermore, asphalt, being a byproduct of the petroleum distillation process, is easily dissolved by other products that also are derived from petroleum, such as oils, fats, grease, mineral spirits etc. The reason is quite logical: As petroleum, these various products existed together for millions of years. It is only through the petroleum refining process that they are separated for various uses. Because these individual products come from the same source, they have a natural affinity for one another and when put in contact with each other will try to join together again. So when automotive oil or gasoline — both petroleum distillates — leak onto an asphalt pavement, they will work to easily dissolve the similar chemicals in asphalt. These problems are associated primarily with off-street pavements such as parking lots, minor streets, airport aprons or runways, service stations, and home driveways, which carry low levels of traffic.
Roads, having the advantage of continuously rolling traffic, do not need protection because the rolling action of the traffic steadily brings the lower layers, rich in asphalt, to the surface and “kneads” the oxidized surface layers back into the pavement. Eventually all the asphalt binder is exhausted and the aggregates begin to unravel due to the absence of the binding cement. This happens to all pavement including roads. The rate of pavement deterioration depends upon the traffic volume as well as climatic conditions. The next step is the development of minor cracks which widen and deepen with time. If the cracks are not repaired at this stage, water seeps into the base courses and damages the pavement’s load bearing capacity. It is evidenced by rutting, shifting, and serious alligatoring. The pavement then must be either overlaid or completely removed and reinstalled, depending on the condition. Off-street pavements do not have the advantage of this “kneading” action. The surface layers of off-road pavements are under continuous attack from the weather and other destructive elements, eventually developing minor surface cracks. Again, aggregates start unraveling producing minor cracks which widen and deepen with time. The damage will continue if proper protective actions are not taken. So it would be logical to conclude that off-street pavements can be preserved by a “protective coating” that resists attack by the elements that destroy the asphalt in the first place.

SEAL CRACKS RIGHT

April 22, 2011 by  
Filed under Testimonials




CLICK ON PICTURES TO ENLARGE

Super Services LLC  injects thermo-sealants that are formulated to perform in the New England climate

and engineered to meet or exceed stringent ASTM specifications to prolong the life of

parking lots, roadways, runways and driveways.

Premium raw materials are hot -blended into a homogeneous chemical composition

in a state of the art manufacturing process.These rubberized sealants bond aggressively

to dry and clean asphalt pavement. Our thermo-sealants will keep moisture out,

providing maximum pavement protection even during the severe stress of freeze/thaw cycles. in hot weather our properly selected and properly applied thermo-sealants will not track.

Save Money – Reduce Maintenance – Increase Your Curb Appeal

CRACK SEALING
Crack sealing prevents water seepage, stops base failure,extends the life of your asphalt surface,

and keeps out foreign matter!

ALL OF WHICH EXTENDS THE LIFE OF YOUR ASPHALT

PAVEMENT & SAVES YOU MONEY!

Cracks in asphalt surfaces allow water to enter at a rapid rate,which travels

directly to the base causing the life of your asphalt surface to be shorter which can be expensive!
It’s a known fact the life of asphalt will be extended if it is regularly maintained!
Hot crack fill and sealcoating
work hand to hand to prevent premature failure of your asphalt surfaces,

The difference between black and gray:
Asphalt sealcoating and crack sealing preserves asphalt pavement with a deep,rich,

black seal that beautifies and protects.
Application requirements and coverage rates vary with age,texture and porosity of the

pavement to be sealed.It is recommended that a in depth evaluation be conducted to

identify the exact needs of the pavement surface in question.
Super Services LLc is eager to help. we encourage you to contact Super Services LLc.
we will be happy to go over every detail concerning your exact situation.

Please contact us now for your Free, No obligation asphalt pavement evaluation and experience the difference.

www.saveyourpavement.com – 800-858 SEAL (7325)

QUESTIONS • COMMENTS • ESTIMATES CALL 800-858-SEAL (7325)

April 21, 2011 by  
Filed under Testimonials




Super Services LLc is available 24/7 for all of your questions concerning Asphalt Pavement.

800-858 SEAL (7325)

SUPER SERVICES uses ▪ Modern Spray Technology / HOT RUBBER INJECTION

⁰and is DEDICATED TO THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE SEALCOAT INDUSTRY⁰

Improve your curb appeal and protect your asphalt driveway or parking lot!!

Our sealcoating process cannot be matched by many. We take the time to make

sure every lot and driveway are prepped properly to insure the sealer will adhere

properly to the pavement. We use only the latest in sealer products with sand

and additives to improve traction, drying time and over all performance, allowing all applications to

withstand  the most extreme conditions.

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